May 2017 #2 In the studio

June 10, 2017

The past few blogs have been exclusively about my textile trip to Laos/Cambodia earlier this year. Just because I haven’t been talking about what has been happening in the studio, doesn’t mean that nothing has been happening. The following are some of the highlights over the past few months.

Back in the February blog # 2, I wrote about Joan who was visiting Australia from Hawaii and extended a holiday to explore waving on a draw loom. She managed to get totally fascinated by the process and has since acquired her own loom. Now that is a great result!

I’m mentioning that because it also gave me the perfect opportunity to explore an idea.

Beside the draw loom (on right), I set up a countermarche loom so that it was a cross between a draw loom having long eyed short heddles at the front and a Laos loom with vertical storage at the back. Having the two looms side by side was an interesting juxtaposition. I did like the potential of weaving similar cloth on both looms. Over a period of time, I had noticed many similarities between the functioning of the Laotian (or any S.E.Asian loom) and the draw loom. This was my opportunity to explore what a hybrid loom could do.

Damask is being woven on the hybrid loom. I have 6 shafts set up for a 6end damask on the front and the stored pattern operating as the pattern shafts at the back.

As in conventional Laotian weaving, the pattern is picked up and stored. In this case however the block patterns are being stored. The stored pattern is then used in much the same way as a pattern shaft on the draw loom – raised for the 6 rows of a 6 shaft satin.

And just because I could do it, I also wove a supplementary weft pattern on the same warp. All the patterns that I have used are from “Lao Motif”.

I will return to this as there’s much potential and it’s such a fun challenge to do. However a group was arriving in the studio.

Every two years a group of like-minded weaving mates get together with the challenge of playing and exploring any technique or structure or in reality anything relating to weaving. There’s discussion and a whole lot of fun to go with it! It’s a highlight of a diary and something to look forward to. It’s been going on quite some time and we’ve had several. Sometimes everyone can come, other times there are fewer. This time it was my turn to play host. (Normally I have to go to USA or Canada). Three weavers came to Australia: Kathy, Jette and Bev. By chance they all decided that they needed to play with my Laos equipment. So there was one traditional Laos style loom and two countermarche looms with Laos vertical storage units.

Weaving mates from three countries: USA, Canada and Australia.

We all wove. Here are three “Lao” looms in action.

There was much group problem solving…..

….and fun. Part of the experience was the duet. They’re chalking up how many places (Towns, States and Countries) they can play together in.

Detail of some of the weaving

I got to play i.e. get around to doing, something that I’d been wanting to do for some time. Keeping in the theme of bands of pattern, I explored structures on my 24 shaft computer assist loom.

And at the end of their stay, I have even more potential for play as now I have three looms with warps for me to weave on. I can go back to my damask/supplementary weft (the original hybrid loom).

I also have the original Laos loom. I decided it could do with an adventure with a saw. As I am not using it any more with a warp in a bag at the front of a loom, I don’t need all that length.  I am using a western style back warp beam to store the warp. I have found that it is much easier to achieve even tension. All I need is a length to allow movement between the vertical storage and the front plain weave/ground shafts.

So saw in hand, it is now shorter and taking up much less floor space in the studio.

But I also have a loom with a ground of overshot. That was a careful bit of planning as now it’s so conveniently set up in time for a 5 day workshop: Beyond the Basics.

Ronda and Jan came to explore profile drafting and converting it into basic weave structures: 4 and 8 shaft forms of Overshot, Crackle, M’s and O’s and a combination of Summer and Winter and a simple lace. It was a very productive week and as well as going home with a whole lot of samples, they’d woven on several different styles of looms including the 16 shaft computer assist and had a portfolio of drafts.Here are some of their samples.

And I still had a bit of warp left on the Overshot/Laos loom. I have plans! I can weave a border with both a finer supplementary weft design in the style of Laos patterning and a larger overshot one.

Here it is with the pattern being developed. It is being woven upside down with these long floats to be on the back.

In addition to weavers working in the studio, I have had a bit of life on the road. My touring exhibition Pattern; A Universal Phenomenon had an outing to Moranbah. The exhibition looked fabulous and was extremely well received.

We even had journal making workshops with hand woven fabric covers in Dysart, Clermont and Moranbah. (Unfortunately I don’t have images from Moranbah)

But then Cyclone Debbie came and Central Queensland was flooded. Demounting couldn’t happen. The town was cut off. Eventually the roads got reopened and life returned to ‘normal’ for that community. I am pleased to report that while the town was flooded, no one was hurt. The upside was that the exhibition had an extended life of an extra month. Pattern has one last showing to complete the touring program. It will be in the Childers Art Space from 15 July to 3 September.

Coming up is another exhibition: Stitched up. I was delighted to be invited to be part of this exhibition. I will report on that process of producing that work and the background behind my concept for the work on the next blog. In the meantime here’s a link to the exhibition.

http://www.thelockup.org.au/whats-on/stitched-up

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February 2017 Part 2

March 2, 2017

In this post, I separate what is going on in the studio and my trip to Laos and Cambodia. Both are so different that they deserve their own space.

Two days after my arrival home from the trip to Laos and Cambodia, I held another Linen and Lace workshop in the studio. Four weavers attended. We explore many lace weaves (Canvas weaves, Spot Bronson, Bronson Lace, Swedish Lace, Huck). Nine warps were woven off so they went home with quite a collection. The following are some images taken over the five days.

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Four weavers with some of the warps being cut off.

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Experimenting with finishing using a modified mangling process: glass bottles filled with cold water. A marble rolling pin on a tile or a piece of glass would be a preferred option.

Then two days later I had Joan, a weaver from Hawaii who combined a tourist trip to Australia with an opportunity to weave in my studio. She decided to explore weaving on a draw loom. But first, there was a minor problem. I had a warp on this loom. It had only been there for about nine months waiting for me to eventually get around to weaving it. There’s nothing like someone wanting to weave on a loom to get you to actually weave. This warp was designed to explore 4 shaft ground weaves. Using just 4 shafts how many basic structures can be woven? But before I show what I wove, I’ll outline the parameters that I’d set. The design was to be basically the same with only variation being in the frame in one corner. I wanted to have a fairly restricted design so that I didn’t spend too much time thinking and moving around pattern shafts (time was of the essence after all). Yet to prevent boredom I allowed myself a small restricted area to play in. You will see the overall standard design with variation.

How many structures can be done on 4 shafts? This many!

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Let’s take a closer look. There’s a 1/3 and 3/1 combination. The direction of the twill line is the same.

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There’s a 1/3 and 3/1 twill with opposite directions. This is a very common effect employed in 8 shaft twill blocks.

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Instead of straight twills, how about warp and weft faced broken twills?

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In the High Court judges’ robes I employed “network drafting” of warp faced straight twill with weft faced broken twill. Here I repeat the effect on a draw loom.

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Moving away from twills, a three end lace weave is possible. This followed very nicely from the previous week’s Linen and Lace.

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A standard 4 shaft straight threading can also be used for pick up Summer and Winter (2 tie unit weave).

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And of course 4 shafts can also be used for doubleweave. Normally the sett would be twice as dense and alternate colours would be used. Instead here I have compensated by using alternate colours in thicker yarns. Obviously by the size of the same I ran out of time before Joan arrived.

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Joan got to pull cords and look at how the loom worked before even getting to wind a warp and thread by playing on the tail end of my warp.

Joan had come with a prepared design based on a photograph of a tiled floor. After planning her project/s, drafting her design, and winding the warp prior to learning about setting up the loom, she got to weave that design. The next challenge was to alter the set up of the pattern shafts to interpret a new design. This one was a simple modification.

This image shows both her first and second design.

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The last challenge required her to use as many pattern shafts as possible threaded individually with the exclusion of a border and design a motif across the full width. She enjoyed the freedom of dropping off all the pattern shafts, rearranging them in a different configuration to allow for total freedom of pattern design. The following images shows Joan cutting off her warp and the different patterns she had designed and woven.

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This is what I love about drawloom weaving: the freedom of developing “block” designs using the pattern shafts of a drawloom. The design potential is so much greater than what can be achieved on any multi-shaft loom (even one with the most number of shafts available on a computer assist loom). The only other loom that has greater potential is a jacquard. It however involves computers. This is the “slow food” equivalent of weaving where there is a much greater “hands on” experience.

 


July 2016

July 28, 2016

My touring exhibition is having another showing. This time it’s at Gatakers Artspace in Maryborough. It is very interesting seeing how the exhibition interacts with different spaces. Gallery 4 at Gatakers is a large open space with exposed beams. That beam provided the perfect place to hang The Hand. Here are some general views of the exhibition. The staff at Gatakers and in particular Anne Brown who helped hang it were great to work with.

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In conjunction with the exhibition was a 5 day workshop. Three students, Pat, Isobel and Karen took advantage weaving for the full time, while Ann could only come for four. It was a great place for a workshop: plenty of light and plenty of room. It was great to work with them. As well as preparing warps, they achieved a lot of weaving.

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Ann explored double weave in a sampler. Both layers were the same colour so it was challenging to keep track of what layer was where without reference to colour. Here’s her sample.

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Then Ann decided to use the rest of the warp for a scarf. But first sections of warp were removed to make a more interesting textile. There will be warp and weft floats as well as double weave layers.

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Karen explored 8 shaft twills. She’s got some interesting colour combinations and structures happening and some that she’s designed herself.

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Pat also explored 8 shaft twills. As a beginner weaver she’s having a lot of fun exploring colour and pattern.

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Isobel is also a beginner weaver. She’s working with four shaft twills.

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Pat, Isobel, a friend and Karen celebrate the week’s achievements.

In addition there was an opportunity for people who had never woven before to come and weave for a day on pre-warped looms. All three are keen to continue. Here are these new weavers with what they wove in one day.

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Gloria

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Stephanie

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Susan.

It was a wonderful week where much was achieved as well as being delightful to spend time with weavers, both beginners and the more experienced.

Queensland Spinners Weavers and Fibre Artists ran a beginner weaving workshop over a weekend. There were three participants. They learnt how to wind a warp, dress a loom and weave. Just look at how much they produced in two days. They certainly went home with beautiful scarves; all very different.

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Tegan, Sally and Leonie with their scarves.

My friend Helen came for a visit. Of course she was going to weave. There was a spare morning so she had the opportunity to try out a draw loom. She did have fun!

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Sally stated weaving last month. For her third warp she decided to weave a tartan silk scarf as a ‘proper project’. In three and a half days she completed a beautiful scarf.

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My exhibition will come down in a few days. It is quite amazing to think how quickly this month has flown.

Finally I’ll share this image. One of the bonuses of having the workshop and exhibition at Gatakers was the opportunity to stay at one of my favourite places. Here’s a sunset at Burrum Heads.

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June 2016

July 3, 2016

This month there’s activity in the studio with two new weavers and a wonderful week with some old friends. I’ve also got some weaving to share

Rosemary continued with her next project. She brought her finished hand towels,

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and is getting one step closer to weaving a proper project using her hand spun mohair. Here she has put on a quick test warp to evaluate both how her spun mohair performs and to calculate shrinkage. She also wished to try out a table loom as she thinks that will fit her space requirements when she gets her own loom.

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Sally is also a beginner weaver. She is obviously having a great time learning to weave. Here she has finished her first warp: a collection of handtowels.

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Then very quickly there was a series of tea towels: to explore both how to weave her MacPhee tartan (colour sequence) and to explore various twills.

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Then even before she had finished off those she was planning her next project: a tartan scarf. As she says who would believe just a short time ago that she’d now be weaving and dyeing.

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In the meantime, I worked on a couple of scarves in double weave with supplementary warps. But then I decided to turn one of these sections into another narrow band of double weave. But how was I going to do that? Well it’s simple really: just add in a couple of temporary shafts, Laos style. What I did discover was that they were so easy to use.

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Then at the end of the month three friends from my time at Sturt arrived for a 5 day intensive. Each had their own project.

Sue wanted to explore lace weaves but more than that wanted to understand the relationship between design, profile and drafting. She wove and initial sample.

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Then after working on theory and developing a design wove a second warp.

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Helen came knowing that she wanted to weave lampshade fabric to compliment an oriental lamp base. She’s requiring both fabric and accent braid. As the braid was the more complex she decided to start with that.

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Gillian came knowing that she wanted to weave curves and explore network drafting. We worked on several design approaches. One was selected to weave into a scarf with additional sampling as time allowed. What was an interesting experience for her was going from her usual table loom to weaving on a computer assist loom.

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It was great having such a diverse range of requirements as each learnt from each other. In addition there was time to spend together.

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Eventually the weather turned and those Southerners got to experience glorious Queensland winter. We even took time out to have lunch and play at Wellington Point.

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 While they were here, I got to start threading my draw loom. Eventually I’ll get to weave on it though it will be some time till I can. In the meantime I’ll get it set up.

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What I do like about drawloom weaving is the flexibility in deciding what to do with pattern shafts. They can be rearranged so easily. I’ll just get the loom ready to weave and  decide later what I’m going to do. I do have 126 pattern blocks to play with.

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November 2015

December 12, 2015

 

I know that it is now well into December but the fates have conspired against my posting a blog at the normal time. Well a thunderstorm resulted in a power surge which resulted in a blown modem + Optus…. and 3 weeks later I’m back on line.

It’s actually interesting now going back to the start of November and seeing what happened then. It was a very exciting month with the start of the conversion of what was my exposed patio into this great new space that I now have. Here’s some images of the conversion.

Looms covered and the boxing starts.

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All the windows and insect screens have arrived. The old gate is off.

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The frame for the big sliding doors. It nearly looks bigger than the space it’s going to fill.

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Windows and doors are in. The walls are finished. Only the insect screens left to do.

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The first celebration of this new space with Helen, Trood and Sheila. Look… no mosquitoes! Now all that has to happen is for it to be painted and tiled but that has to wait just a little longer.

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In amongst the building I had Sharon and Vilasa come and weave rugs. In 5 days they both designed and wove a beautiful floor rug each. It was great having them back in the studio.

Sharon chose to weave a very bold design.

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Vilasa uses predominantly hand spun yarn with frequent colour change and a great use of colour blending.

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The finished rugs. I even got to weave another loom bench rug.

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My weekly students finished off their projects.

Fleur has finished her beautiful warp dyed silk scarf.

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Paula finishes firstly a series of hand towels. This is her first time on a floor loom.

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And then a small hand spun wrap for her daughter.

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Karen, a new weaver, finishes her series of tea towels.

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I also acquired another loom. Ngarita and Mike West help me dismantle it.

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It was assembled very quickly in the studio. This is the loom that Sharon used.

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Finally, I managed to finish off the warp on the draw loom. This small hanging is another Laos inspired piece. It combines the Laos pattern I used last month with some 4 shaft supplementary weft pattern.

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It is now into December. I will not share what has happened so far this month. It can wait. I am very much aware that coming at a rush is the Festive Season. Enjoy!

 

 

 


October 2015

November 4, 2015

Firstly as usual, student work and then there’s more on the Laos project.

This month I travelled to Go Create, halfway between Walcha and Uralla in the New England region of NSW. It is a stunning destination. They are offering a wide range of predominantly textile related classes. www.gocreatenewengland.com

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The six students explored weaving with recycled materials. Two were absolute new weavers, two had limited experience and two were more experienced. By the end of the first day, you couldn’t tell the difference in technique between the beginners and more experienced. I was delighted! I was also delighted by how enthusiastically they embraced using a wide range of materials, exploring methods of incorporating them into the woven structure. Three sessions explored specific techniques with the last allowing for individual exploration. The following shows the group and what was accomplished. This is followed by an image of individual students’ work. It was a great weekend.

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In the studio: Fleur finishes her scarf. This project was of her own design, using an aspect of the sampling from her first project.

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And she begins her third project. Fleur has acquired some silk to weave a scarf and wanted to do some warp painting. It’s also her first attempt at dyeing. She’s on an exciting journey.

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Now for the continuing Laos loom experiment.

Last month I got to the point of having the pattern stored. It is a relatively simple matter to transfer the stored design to weave the supplementary weft pattern.

Here’s a brief movie of a traditional weaver (Laos and Thailand) How to use a vertical storage system using bamboo memory rods. www.youtube.com/vNxPTl0sWVM

The process that I used: Remove the pattern stick from its support.

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Lower it closer to the warp. Swish it front to back till there’s a cleared gap.

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I put an extra stick in which is not as flexible to move the heddles at the front well forward, though traditionally this isn’t done. That extra stick is also insurance so that I can move the pattern stick to its next position: either above or below the warp and know that I’ll not have picked up or lost any of the stored design: in this case it is moved to below the warp line.

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With the pattern heddles moved well towards the front, it is a simple process to raise the selected heddles by pulling on them so that the sword can be inserted.

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When turned on its side the pattern row is ready to weave. This image shows the sword turned on its side behind the plain weave shafts and beater with the pattern shuttle in the shed.

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There are two pattern rows woven for each lift with plain weave between. You do not need to take the sword out. If it is pushed back, having the sword in has no effect on compromising the shed for the plain weave.

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I have used this basic process to also weave the brocade or discontinuous weft pattern. A pattern weft is required for each motif.

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When I saw the ladies in Laos weaving I enquired if they only used one foot. No one used two. Now I know why. It is much easier to control these free hanging treadles if a heel and toe action is used. The one foot controls the position of the treadles. They don’t move as much as the foot is always connected to both, all be it in a very minor way when not using one of them. It is all very motion efficient.

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As each pattern area is woven, the pattern sticks are moved above and below the warp line. When they are below, there’s no need for any support.

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Another pattern area is woven.

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The weaving is completed.

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Now to separate the scarf while making sure I retain the stored pattern. I may want to reuse this at a later date and with the Laos system, this is possible. I want to keep the vertical storage system threaded and able to be reused but without the stored pattern. Firstly, I reinsert the lease sticks as I want to be able to rethread this warp later for plain weave and using a more western set of shafts and further experimentation. These are moved to behind the vertical storage system and can be moved to the front when I’m ready.

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Then, I transfer the vertically stored pattern to the horizontal. In essence I use a similar method to when I was weaving, however keeping in the sticks in the warp. They are positioned as close to the plain weave shafts as possible.

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Once all the pattern sticks have been transferred, I carefully cut the warp between the storage system and the series of sticks, knotting on both sides.

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Once the knots have been undone, the entire collection of stored pattern, shafts, reed and woven scarf can be removed from the loom.

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Now to separate the stored pattern and scarf. Once the scarf is cut off, the warp in front of the reed is secured. I can now put the stored pattern to one side to be used at a later date if required.

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Finally I have completed the project. Some detail:

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This image shows my scarf with the original source of inspiration.

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Now that I have completed the project there are some points I want to explore. This loom has many similarities to a western drawloom in that both have two sets of heddles. One is to weave the plain weave base fabric, the other to select the supplementary pattern. One of the questions I have is: How do they compare and is there any difference in efficiency? This image shows the two sets of heddles on a drawloom. On the left are the shafts which will be used for plain weave. On the left are those for the supplementary weft pattern.

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For this project I have used the same warp though it has been threaded at a more open sett (density of the warp threads) to allow for the same warp and weft yarn to be used this time. I have also decided to keep to the original basic design although on a narrower width. The design for the pattern stripes is based on this scarf that uses the basic motif in an all over design and with some different stripe patterns.

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I have also decided to simplify the border and transition. The original requires about 40 pattern shafts. This simplified version, just 14 . Here’s the draft. For optimal weaving to provide distance between the plain weave and pattern shafts, I have chosen to start threading the pattern shafts on shaft 3.

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This is the process that I used to weave the pattern: The loom is threaded so that each thread that works in the same way will be on the same shaft. To weave a pattern row the warp threads on each shaft that makes up the pattern are selected. So for the first pattern row (the one at the top), I need to pull shafts 4, 5, 8, 11 and 13. This process needs to be done after every plain weave row. It is very labour intensive with multiple shafts being pulled for each pattern row every time one is required. There’s no stored design option here.

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The scarf nearly finished. All I have to do is weave 12 cm of plain weave.

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How did they compare?

Setting up to weave: On the drawloom, the warp was beamed and then threaded through firstly the pattern shafts and then the front plain weave shafts. I much preferred the other loom where I just knotted and tied on and then beamed the warp (after of course experimenting with the traditional method of handling a warp).

Using the pattern shafts to store the pattern: On the Laos loom, it was extremely slow to pick up and store the pattern on the sticks. Initially I did wonder about have the equivalent of these sticks on each pattern shaft on the drawloom. That would have meant that I could just pull one cord and the appropriate row be selected. However, the number of long eyed heddles would have been huge as each pattern repeat would have required 105 long short eyed heddles. There are 7 repeats. I just didn’t have them. So instead, I threaded it in a point threading on 12 shafts.

Using the pattern shafts to weave the pattern: See the descriptions above. On the drawloom, I had to select several pull cords to achieve the right combination for the pattern whereas there was just one bamboo stick for the Laos pattern row. Where the pattern was repeated a number of times, the Laos loom was the most efficient; it just needed the sword to be turned on its side after each plain weave row. The pattern sword stayed in place. The drawloom required a number of cords to be pulled each time. Because the Laos system was new, I got up for each pattern change. The ladies who do this normally just change from the seated position. If I didn’t do this, they would probably take about the same length of time. The pulling of the cords probably allows for a greater incidence of mistake as the Laos pattern is preselected.

Storing the pattern for another time: On the Laos loom, the pattern, plain weave and reed has been stored and can be reused to duplicate the next project. It would be possible to change the sett by rethreading. I’ll have to set up the drawloom from the beginning for another project.

As the drawloom has a number of pattern shafts there is more loom waste than on the Laos loom in its current format with all the pattern ‘shafts’ stored vertically.

By the way, I’m finding the Laos loom much lighter to weave plain weave than the countermarched action of the drawloom in spite of treadles that are not fixed.

Here’s a look at what I have just completed. The woven scarf with the original.

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My working collection: two original scarves with two that I’ve woven.

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There’s an exciting development in the studio. I have decided that I’m enjoying weaving “in the garden” very much but I do not enjoy being exposed to the wind and rain. I am now in the process of achieving the best of both worlds with the patio being weatherproofed.

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January 2015

January 18, 2015

A group of 6 friends and a weaving “retreat”- this had been planned at Complex Weavers Seminars back in July but did so nicely mark the start of a new era post Sturt. I had a week or so of starting to unpack, rearrange and re-establish my studio space. Then I was off to Canada.

I thought I’d share this event not so much from the point of view of what I/we did but rather the idea behind it and the management there of. This is the sort of event that a group of friends can easily manage and perhaps may prove food for thought for others.

This group has evolved from a week’s class at Vavstuga in 2009 Then a group of friends had got together and organised a “Special” with the theme driven primarily by the group with equal input from Becky. This is the second retreat that has evolved from that, though the first I have been able to attend. So that there’s a tag, we call them “Special, Specials”.

Why? It’s a gathering of friends. Our group consists of weavers with a certain amount of skill. Many of us have taught. There is a level of freedom in this event as none of us are there to “teach”. We are there to do our own thing, share and depending on what is being explored we will each have different backgrounds to bring experience to the discussion. We are all there to learn both from what our own project is and what the group is doing. Discussion is open and free flowing. It provides time out from a busy normal schedule to allow time to focus on weaving. It provides an excuse to investigate something you’ve been meaning to do possibly for a while as it really is classed as “play time” as opposed to “have to do weave time”. There is a sense of freedom in that, as the outcome need not necessarily be successful. So the aim is a great group of friends gathering in the hunt for knowledge and having a grand time doing it.

Where: In the studio of Jette, Hillsdale, Ontario. A great destination: I get to escape the humidity and heat of Queensland and experience snow. Being in someone’s studio does mean a level of comfort and relaxation though does have some limitations. The number of participants and activities of the group are limited by the looms and space available. Because Jette and Bev live close together, accommodation was split.

When: 5 days over New Year- 2014/5 though I got to play for about 10 as I had to travel further. The members were: 2 local Canadians, 3 from USA and 1 Australian.

Who: The hosts Jette and Harry, Bev, Bettes, Becky, Deb and myself. Harry is most essential in his role of engineering consultant, let alone as “mine host”.

The management: Prior to the retreat we give some thought to what we’d like to do. Jette has identified what looms are available and we negotiate between each other as to topic and loom requirements. In this case there was no need to negotiate as there were no clashes with loom/topic requirements. There were 2 draw looms, a 16 shaft computer assist and several 8 shaft ones

As no one person was to spend more time than anyone else in the kitchen, we drew up a roster and nominated meals to be prepared by each. In some cases, meals were prepared at home, in others prepared on site. Cleaning up was a group effort. Our best laid plans were set aside when we had leftovers. They sure did make life easy.

Some warps were prepared off site though most were wound on site.

We arrived. We played. We wove. We talked. We achieved….. a conversion of an 8 shaft table loom to a “draw loom”, a modification of 8 shaft floor loom into Vietnamese loom, an investigation into how much weight can be obtained on a draw loom, ties and structure (most investigated this in some shape or form but that was accidental), how to use a split shed (several in various guises) and much more. While each worked on their own challenge, it was amazing how many commonalities there were.

The most valuable lesson we learned or that was confirmed: the desirability of having time to discuss ideas and to explore an idea. We made sure there was time to toss around what we had done and why we were doing it. Meal time discussion was all encompassing. This time we had decided not to swap looms. This took total pressure off of having to set up the loom, trouble shoot and to weave. It was great knowing that if you needed a break, you could have one: whether it was just go somewhere quietly and think or to go for a walk or even do some snow activities. It was totally self driven.

I came home with some questions answered, more to be explored and some pretty exciting future challenges. This cross fertilization of ideas is invaluable.

The photos:

I must admit that it was difficult to remember to grab the camera sometimes. We were just too busy.

DSC00017 - 1They promised me snow…. BUT where was it?

DSC00020Day 1: the snow arrived. We had a break and went for a walk.

DSC00067- 4How much weight? Water in two bottles, lingoes and even more though smaller weights in front of these= a very controlled warp.

DSC00071 - 3A table loom converted to a drawloom.

DSC00072- 6Discussion….

DSC00089- 10Progress….

IMG_4147Photo by Becky. Thanks Becky.

DSC00094Checking out what I’m doing.

DSC00091- 11Deb: Stage one completed. Now to convert to a Vietnamese loom.. Note the blue plastic roller used to store pattern.

DSC00082 - 9Becky contemplates. She wins the award (if there was one) for the most hours spent in the studio. She even slept in the studio on the last night to make sure she finished.

I missed getting a photo of what Bettes was doing. The first half  of our time flew by without a camera to hand. By the time I remembered, she was spending a session with Harry constructing.

DSC00077- 8The six of us.

DSC00122A real Winter’s wonderland!

I came home to a studio which still needed time to sort out. In all, the big reorganisation has taken 3 weeks but now it is ready for when I do start work. It’s a great feeling knowing that it is finished. I have now 6 looms in that space: a 24 and 16 computer assist, a draw loom, 2 x 8 shaft jacks and 1 countermarche. I have plans for two others though those plans will be revealed later. One of those involved late night discussion with Harry.

DSC00132 (600 x 400)

Now to the future: there’s an interesting time ahead. In the meantime I would like to promote two upcoming events at which I am teaching

Fibres Ballarat SUNDAY 5 APRIL – SATURDAY 11 APRIL 2015

There are still places in a few classes including my weaving one : Ties: Decorative, Functional and Unconventional. http://fibrearts.jigsy.com/

Fibre Forum, an event held by Southeast Fiber Arts Alliance, USA. April 16 -19 held at Arrowmont, Gatlinburg. There’s space in some classes including “East Meets West”. http://www.sefiberforum.org/referral.html