July 2018: Convergence and Complex Weavers Seminars.

August 2, 2018

It was the gathering of the international weaving clan. Weavers came from around the world to attend Convergence organised by Hand weavers Guild of America (HGA) and then for a very focussed group of weavers, Complex Weavers Seminars at Reno, Nevada, USA. This was the first year they had been run at the same time for a number of years. It was great that I could again attend both easily as now it just took one return airfare.

Both were held at the Peppermill Resort, a very large casino and convention centre.

I arrived a few days before CW was due to start primarily so that I could check out Convergence and in particular the vendor hall and the exhibits. Here are some highlights from those first few days.

I came in the doors and saw all the traders. One did get used to the carpet. Large bold designs were typical of the over the top décor.

As well as ethnic collections, yarn, books, looms and all things textiles, there were two new pieces of equipment that took my eye and that I will mention.

TempoTreadle is a very neat electronic device and provides amongst other features a way of keeping track of shaft lifts for weaving sequences for a table loom. http://tempotreadle.com.

There’s a new loom out by AVL. It looks totally different to their past looms and functions like a countermarche.

Next door there were several exhibitions. I was in particular interested in those chosen for the fashion parade and the yardage exhibit and of course those that were hand woven. Congratulations go to all those who exhibited here and in outside venues. It is always interesting to see other’s textiles. Here’s a list of exhibitions listed in the gallery guide. I got to see them all.

City Lights, Festive Nights, the wearable art exhibit that was put up following the fashion parade. These are some of the winning entries. Each entry was accompanied by a handling piece.

First place: Mimi Anderson. Friday Night Fever:  4 colour double weave.

Second Place: Inge Dam with Manon Pelletier, Band of Northern Lights, Tablet bands integrated and woven with a 32 shaft twill.

Third Place and the Seattle Weavers Guild- Virginia Harvey Award for Color: Lillian Whipple with Sharon Bell, Red to Blue and Green All Over Jacket.

Here’s a general view of some of the exhibits showing how they were displayed.

 

 

Trukee River, the yardage exhibition was very accessible this time. In the past the exhibits had been hung above the heads of attendees often from a balcony. It was great being up close to the full length. Here are some selected pieces.

 

First place: Slip streams by Kathryn Arnoldin turned taquete.

Second place: Secrets in the Water, Dottie Weir, handwoven shibori on ice dyed warp fibre reactive dyes, discharge, overdyed with vat dyes.

Third place: Water is Life, Nancy Peterson, Handwoven crimped tencel with polyester sewing thread.

Complex Weavers Award: Tablet Woven Triptych John Mullarkey.

While this piece did not win an award, I was very excited and delighted to see that Joan Namkoong represented by two pieces. Both were delightful. However it was this piece that really made me stand still and think “Wow”.   Tapa (Hawaiian stamped bark cloth)  was woven in a 6 shaft satin on a drawloom. Joan had worked in my studio and it was there that she discovered drawloom weaving. She became hooked and went home and acquired her drawloom. No wonder I was excited to see this piece.

It was announced that Convergence in 2020 will be in Knoxville, Tennessee in the last part of July.

And then finally Complex Weavers Seminars began. It started with the exhibition opening of Complexity 2018: Innovations in Weaving. It was a great way to provide a very focused start.  I was honored to have been asked to jury it along with Janice Lessman-Moss (USA) and Jette Vandermeiden (Canada); a very international jury. The initial jurying was done on line using a five-foil Likert Scale in the Submittable format. It was a tough job as there were many fabulous entries. We scored them blind and from this score, the gallery staff selected the 27 works from 23 artists. Jette and I had the difficult though rewarding job of selecting the awards prior to the opening as we were both there. We also consider ourselves very fortunate as we could handle and check what was on the back of the pieces: a very decided benefit! Complexity was hung in Metro Gallery in the City Hall. Many people got to see it purely because of its location. This is what it looked like with an early crowd at the Opening.

For a Gallery guide and the list of awards and winners go to http://www.complex-weavers.org/gallery/complexity-2018/  This will provide a much better way of viewing the exhibit than I could ever provide here.

One of the wonderful benefits of Seminars is that there are many opportunities to meet other like- minded weavers and to catch up with fiends from around the world. Meals are held together. There are a wide range of events: an informal fashion parade, traders, the silent auction, meetings of study groups and of course, the seminars.

There were a wide variety of topics presented. I was honored to have been selected and I presented Ties: Decorative, Practical and Unconventional and absolutely delighted with the buzz after the presentation.

 

I must admit I don’t have too many images to share. I was just too busy having a great time.

There is an exciting publication that will soon be available. It celebrates the 40th anniversary of CW. After the fashion parade, those weavers who had a piece in the forthcoming book took the floor. There were many interesting pieces. I can’t wait to see it. It is now available for pre-sale on the website. http://www.complex-weavers.org

Here’s some of the weavers with work in the book.

One of the results that I will share here came from the meeting of the Double Harness Study Group.. I had co-chaired the meeting with Jette Vandermeiden. I’ll also mention that the Double Harness Study Group is the oldest study group in CW. It was the first one formed. It was very satisfying to see a very enthusiastic gathering and is encouraging for the future.

From the meeting came the request to share two loom modifications. That has already happened and I thought that this was also an opportunity to share those here. They had happened over a number of years. The first I did in 2011 and my original article was presented in the International Damask Newsletter in Winter, 2011. A simple conversion for a Glimakra loom with an Opphampta attachment.     Jette wrote up her development, a variation of mine for the same publication in Autumn 2012. However the modification didn’t end there. The final modification for both Jette and I came about when her engineering husband became interested. The result was Medusa. I’ll put both a separate page on my blog under “Looms and loom modifications” for future reference.

Good times, great learning were had by all. I’ll look forward to the next Seminars in 2020. The last hurrah: a celebration great times at CW Seminars 2018.

Forthcoming classes in my studio

3-7 September Double weave and friends

1-5 October Colour in weaving: colour and weave effects, shadow weave, echo weave and optical colour blending.

12-16 November Woven shibori

10- 14 December Special also includes beginning weaving

Forth Monday September – November inclusive. BYO Loom: work on your own project with a review on the following month.

Full details under Kay’s Weaving School on my blog.


June 2018: My studio and other events.

July 3, 2018

This will be a short blog after the mammoth job of writing up the series from my textile tour to the Lesser Sunda Islands. However life has been busy.

Soon after arriving home I was off to Canberra for the weekend to teach for the guild there. There were a great group of weavers who were enthusiastic about learning Summer and Winter. Great results were achieved but unfortunately, I forgot to take photos. Twelve students had at work.

And then it was home for a 5 day “Special”. The three students had the opportunity to weave whatever project they wanted. Rochelle and Jan had both missed out on the twill class so decided that this was an ideal opportunity to expand their knowledge.

Jan took delight in weaving a set technique and then threw caution to the wind and developed some exiting variations.

Rochelle completed variations on a theme by exploring treadling sequences for her 3 scarves. They are all quite different.

Katie, from the USA had been travelling in S. E. Asia and stopped off for the class. Her project was to weave fabric for a tunic in weft ikat and silk. Here’s the fabric just off the loom.

A close up view of one of the sections. 3 dye baths were required to achieve this ikat. There’s a hint of olive or pink at either edge of the black.

I have finally got this piece of weaving off the loom. It’s taken a while but then again, I guess you have to be home to weave. And it was at about this stage that I wondered why I did weft shibori. Warp shibori would have taken way fewer threads to pull up.

 

 

And then some indigo. After my trip, there was a definite pull towards indigo as a preference.

And the great undoing. I’m very happy with the result.

I have been asked by several weavers about running a one day a month studio class at my studio. So on a Monday from September to November inclusive the studio will be open. I’m calling this a BYO loom class. Students will be required to bring their own loom. They may do any project according to their personal requirements. It may be to learn to weave or brush up on some skills for a beginner or something more advanced for the more experienced or even designing and planning a series. My intention is to provide the framework that allows students to decide on a project, have the month to weave and then bring it back for evaluation before starting a second one.

Other forthcoming classes include:

3-7 September Double weave and friends

1-5 October Colour in weaving: colour and weave effects, shadow weave, echo weave and optical colour blending.

12-16 November Woven shibori

10- 14 December Special also includes beginning weaving

 

All the details are on this blog under “Kay’s Weaving School” at the top of this blog.

I’m enjoying my Textile Wall. It is certainly bringing back great memories and it was certainly way too early to put away those wonderful textiles from my last trip.


At the end of April 2018: profile drafting and weave structures among other things.

May 6, 2018

I have been on an adventure to western Queensland. No, this blog will not be about that but in passing I will mention that I’m sure that the colours, textures and history in particular will find expression sometime in my work. The Longreach and Winton areas are extremely interesting destinations.

Rochelle spent a couple of days in the studio and finally finished her gigantic double width blanket. She has promised to bring it back totally finished. I bet it will keep her warm as toast. A reminder for others out there: the studio is available on a negotiated basis for students to come and weave.

This month’s studio class was Beyond Basics where we started with profile drafting and extended into structure. Jen and Hilary, both from Western Australia, produced a quantity of weaving files and actual weaving. This is an overview of the 5 day class. All the warps had the same profile drafts for the treading, while the treadling was based on each students profile draft. In this way all the samples related.

There were several hours spent on creating weaving drafts.


Jen weaving Atwater Bronson lace on a wool warp with a silk weft.

Hilary is weaving twill blocks on a draw loom. The pattern shafts are arranged as for the profile draft. What a great way this is to promote understanding of how profile drafting can be used. It’s also a fun experience.

Fabrics include 4 and 8 shaft overshot, crackle, atwater and bronson lace, summer and winter, twill blocks. The following images were taken late on the last day when the lighting wasn’t all that good.

Jen’s collection:

Hilary’s collection:

Congratulations to both. They have some very beautiful results and all projects are totally finished. It was a great 5 days. What a lot of work they did!

There was enough warp left over on two of the “overshot” looms for me to play. There had been much discussion on the length of supplementary weft floats when weaving overshot. So the challenge was for me initiated by the students was to find ways to make use of these long floats to make interesting fabrics. I’ll share these 3 experiments. It was a great way to clear the looms and to enable students to really appreciate the potential of a structure.

Of course there’s always woven shibori. Any structure that achieves long supplementary floats is ideal for converting into weft shibori. Eventually I will get around to dye this hand towel.

This hand towel uses just one block of supplementary weft which are then stitched into groups once removed from the loom. It’s a pretty effect.

When weaving multishaft overshot (a 4 shaft profile draft converts to 8 shafts of structure) each block can be woven independently. This meant that I elected to use just the half tones with just weft floats on the front to weave this fabric. The pleating will stretch because of the wool/lycra yarn that was used. The finished result and the reverse side and before laundering.

 

 

I thought the weavers may enjoy my installation. I had acquired these very rusty reeds over a number of years. Here, at the entrance to the studio, was the opportunity to do something with them.

 

Next month: There will be no studio classes. I’m getting ready to set off on another textile adventure.


March 2018. Individual journeys in two workshops

March 31, 2018

There has been two remarkable workshops this month. Gatakers in Maryborough hosted the first and a week later, the second was in my studio school. I am feeling very blessed to have spent time with both groups of weavers sharing their journeys of wonderment.

At Gatakers in Maryborough there was this sign in the studio. I thought that it was appropriate. Maryborough have laid claim to Mary Poppins as P L Travers, the author was born there.

In the studio there were four weavers: one was a beginner and the other three explored aspects of double weave.

I’d like to share their journeys.

Gloria is now a weaver. In five days she explored structure, colour interplay and some finger manipulated techniques. She started from never having threaded a loom to this.

The three weavers doing double weave each had a different threading. The first few days was spent exploring some basics.

Then each worked on their individual areas of study. It was great having the three different threadings as each weaver could learn from the others.

Anne wanted to explore aspects of pick up.

Karen explored structure on different layers. She even completed a small project with a complex interplay of colour, twills of different balance and supplementary wefts. All the activity is on the front while the back is just plain weave.

Chris explored double weave blocks. As her blocks were very small she could also play with warp and weft floats.

It was a very special week. Here’s an overview of what they achieved.

The following week there were two students in the studio exploring “From a Twill Threading”. I’d set up the looms to explore different aspects. It’s always interesting to see what aspect excites and where the development of ideas takes them. Sue was a new weaver while Jennie had more experience.

There were some basic techniques to be covered but also time to explore “What if?”. According to Jennie she really appreciated what she called “thinking time”: yes there was plenty of theory.

Sue weaving corkscrew twills on a parallel threading.

Jennie weaving twill blocks with colour interplay.

 

Here’s what they’d achieved by the end of the week. (Jennie’s collection and then Sue’s)

 

I’ve included some close ups of their work because I found what they chose to do fascinating. You might too. Unfortunately I didn’t take many close up details of Jennie’s work. She had to leave early and rushed out the door.

At 4.00 on the last day, Sue ( a beginner weaver) decided that she’d really like to try the draw loom. She found it a fascinating experience choosing what to do with her blocks of twill. And yes, Sue put into practice what she’d been playing with and went “back and forward”. Random blocks she called this. It’s great to see someone on a loom that looks complicated but makes sense when she weaves on it.

It truly has been a remarkable two weeks. Congratulations to all weavers!

Next month in the studio, the next class is “Beyond the basics”. We’ll explore profile drafting and converting them into classic weave structures. There’s one place left.


February 2018: Linen and Lace, Woven Shibori and other stuff.

March 5, 2018

In the studio this month I held the second Linen and Lace class. The class was nearly full with 4 students. That is why this follows on from #1 in January. There were great results again. Here are some images of work by Karen, Jen and Jan. It is worthwhile to note that two of these are fairly new weavers.

They wove. Karen is missing from this photo.


And they finished off. Here a Swedish Lace series is being mangled using a marble rolling pin.

And went home with a great collection.

Jen’s collection

 

Karen’s collection

 

Jan’s collection.

Rochelle after attending #1 decided that she’d like to weave a double width alpaca blanket, so she had the opportunity to also refresh on the theory… and to check out what the others did.

 

One of the additional challenges of this week was to experiment with pick up on lace weaves if time permitted. In this way all could come to an understanding that more complex design could be achieved with minimal shafts. There are some projects in both Jen and Jan’s collection. Having the loom threaded that way also allowed me to play with a couple of combinations both while the class was underway and afterwards.

On the Bronson Lace warp students could accomplish pick up of a design for an overall pattern or combine it with inlay. I got to weave these two examples.

 

For those interested in drafts, here it is.

The other pick up warp was on Spot Bronson. Jen got to weave a complex spot Bronson design while I got to play with combinations afterwards. This is my playtime, all off the one warp.

I threaded that one so that both lace and Summer and Winter could be woven at the same time. Jen got to weave a complex spot Bronson design while I got to play with combinations afterwards. I also wanted to revisit the experimentation I’d done with doupe leno from the previous workshop. So it was a 3 way challenge and a bit of forward planning was required.

Here’s the basic draft.

Spot Bronson and Summer and Winter combined. Note as well as being woven full width, there’s an isolated motif in the middle of the lace weave.

To weave the leno, I required a group of 4 threads per dent if I was going to explore more doupe leno stored on an additional stick. My aim was to compare the method that I’d used in the previous month on a countermarche loom with this on the jack loom. However the loom had been threaded 2 per dent. As I knew that I’d be taking advantage of this warp I used a reed where I could remove the uprights allowing me to maintain the sett while achieving 4 per dent. Part way through increasing dent size.

An overhead view of this reed. Once I’m finished, I slide the brass strip back into place securing the reed.

This image shows the leno being picked up. Note the wider spacing has also grouped four threads across in the plain weave.

Preparing one group of 4 to be placed on a doupe. More about this process can be seen on January’s post. I found this process much easier to weave on the Jack loom. The important thing to remember is to put light tension on the pick up leno shaft as each row is woven. It prevents doupes being caught as the shafts change.

 

The finished leno.

On modifying my reed spacing: One might ask why I just didn’t use a reed with wider spaces to start with. So for the last experiment, I also wove a piece with leno (pick up alternating) and Spot Bronson as an all over pattern. While weaving the threads were very much isolated in groups of 4. After finishing, the warp threads are more evenly spaced. However while weaving, because of the denting, it was impossible to beat the fabric to square as a result the lace floats are elongated.

Here’s the finished collection from that experimental warp.

 

At the end of this month I was invited to teach at a weaving retreat for 5 weavers at Sewjourn, just north of Melbourne. They had chosen woven shibori as the focus for their study with a bit of additional dyeing tossed in.

Sewjourn is a perfect location for a small group. It has well set up and basic accommodation where you self- cater and a great studio space, set in a rural location. Those weavers sure can cook!

It was an amazing 5 days. Congratulations to Trudi, Di, Jillian, Elizabeth and Kaye. Here are some images.

The studio. Weavers hard at play (aka work).

Some fibre reactive dyeing both as painted warps and pulled up woven shibori.

Different shades of blue from the indigo bath.

Completed dyeing of warps (painted and ikat) and small skeins for weft ikat.

A weft ikat being woven. While the focus was on woven shibori, it was too good an opportunity to see how this would weave up.

The result of a fabulous five days of play.

Next month: In the studio there will be a 5 day class focusing on all manner of twills. There are still 2 places available.

 


January 2018 Lace weaves and Leno

February 2, 2018

In January, I hosted Linen and Lace in my studio. This class will be run again in a few weeks’ time. My intention is to run small classes with highly personalised teaching, hence the need to divide it into two. It also gives me an opportunity to play as you’ll see later.

Rochelle and Heather explored all manner of lace weaves (Spot Bronson, Bronson, Swedish, Huck, 3 or 5 ends and one piece that combined several). They demystified structures, investigated finishing techniques and took home a collection of beautifully woven and finished pieces. Here’s some images from the 5 days. Congratulations to both of them. It was a great week!

 

 

They also explored leno with one piece. The left over warp gave me the perfect opportunity to play.  They got to see the benefit of my play so it’s a “win, win” situation. Towards the end of last year I had explored a technique from John Becker’s Pattern and Loom: Chapter 1, Chinese Han monochrome pattern weaves. The next chapter is on gauze weaves and I spied leno from the Han Dynasty. What caught my attention was a drawing showing loops (or doupes) put on a rod that mechanically achieved those twists that characterised leno. I have used a treadle doupe system to achieve leno and while it works a treat, it takes ages to set up. I wondered how efficiently this would work. It also ties in very nicely with my fascination with S. E. Asian textiles as I’d been seeing leno in use there. Here’s an example from my collection from Bhutan with a detailed view.

 

Leno is a different way of creating a lacy effect to “lace weaves” which are loom structured. They are classed as being in the “gauze” family. However they do still fit nicely into the week’s theme.

So I set it up. Here’s some things I had to consider. I was working with linen at a sett of 8 epcm (20epi). The warp was already on the loom however I would need to rethread the reed to do what I wanted to do.  Each twist has to have all multiples in one dent of a reed, and I did want to use a reed. So I went to my collection of reeds and found one that had a spacing of 3 dpcm. That meant that I’d thread the reed with 4 per dent for two dents and then leave one free. A dent by the way for those non weavers is a space in the reed.  I quite liked the look of the spaced warp.

Then I had to construct the loops or doupes for the leno. These loops are between the reed and the shafts. It’s easy enough to create the twist in front of the beater and transfer to behind the reed. I could have constructed these loops in much the same way that I do for heddles on SE Asian looms. However I took the soft option of using old texsolv heddles folded in half. They were a bit bulky but it would save time and let me see how this would work.

These two images show how the loops are formed to create the leno twist.

 

The rod with all those loops on behind the beater.

To weave, it was a relatively simple matter to raise the extra shaft to create those leno twists across the full width of the piece. I did find that it was most effective as the shed wasn’t huge to insert a stick to clear the shed.

The loom I’m using is a countermarche. On this loom there is a lot of movement with the warp threads going up and down. I did find that to weave plain weave a bit of tension on the loop stick allowed for a freer passage of the warp threads. Once you go into the rhythm of just putting a bit of tension while the threads were passing through the “neutral” position at the middle of the treadling movement, weaving progressed easily.

By the way the weft thread is heavier than the warp. I wanted weaving to progress quickly for this experiment. My choice was that heavier white linen thread in my stash: the only one and one that I’d like used up. I’m not sure that it was the best colour choice but it suited my purpose.

Weaving progresses on the loom.

 

After finishing. The first image has light behind to see the leno more clearly.

 

And while I was about it here’s a piece of leno that is manually manipulated using the threading on the same loom. The threads in one dent are twisted with those in the next dent and then offset. One image is just woven while the other is after washing. Note how much the denting space has closed up.

The next class on Linen and Lace is from 19-23rd . There’s still 1 place left. Perhaps my students and I will have time to do some more play with leno.


November 2017: A woven shibori studio class and textile exhibitions in Canberra, Bendigo and Tamworth.

December 4, 2017

 

Philip and Annette spent 5 days in the studio working with various woven shibori techniques. Looms were pre-threaded with both warp and weft shibori and different fibre/yarns combinations to explore as wide a range of techniques as possible.

Firstly fabrics were woven that incorporated either a supplementary weft or warp thread.

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These threads were then pulled up very tightly. Hopefully the area that is not exposed will not be accessible to dye. Annette is pulling up one of her samples.

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After dyeing these threads are pulled out exposing a dye pattern. Philip is in the process of removing his resist. The fabric is opening up to reveal the pattern.

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Once undone, the work was washed. Here’s a collection on the line.

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and closer details of work.

 

 

Some of Philip’s collection, hemmed and totally finished. Annette had to leave early so I don’t have an image of hers.

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This month I was also fortunate to see some significant textile exhibitions.

There were two exhibitions in Canberra celebrating 50 years of the Canberra Spinners and Weavers. Crossing Threads can be found at the Canberra Museum and Gallery. This is a retrospective exhibition and it was wonderful to see the depth of weaving practice over past years. This exhibition, curated by Meredith Hinchliffe is on till 18 March 2018. www.cmag.com.au

 

 

At the same time, The Canberra Spinners and Weavers hosted an exhibition, 50 Years Looking Forward. This exhibition is of current member’s work and also curated by Meredith Hinchliffe. The work was beautifully presented and included a great diversity of well-crafted items. Congratulations to all involved. This exhibition closed on 25 November www.camberraspinnersandweavers.org.au

I was delighted to be able to be in Bendigo and see The Costume Designer: Edith Head and Hollywood. I had head an interview on ABC radio and went with great expectations. This exhibition did not disappoint. It is an extensive and includes images and movies of costumes, drawings, quotes, background information on her design process and of course many costumes. It’s on till 21 January 2018 and I’d highly recommend you get to see it if you can. www.bendigoartgallery.com.au

 

 

 

 

 

The last exhibition was the 3rd Tamworth Triennial. Tamworth has had a long tradition of hosting high quality and often cutting edge textile exhibitions with often work by world acclaimed textile makers. At first a biennial since 1975, it is now a triennial. It has had a remarkable reputation so I went with great expectations. I was so disappointed! There were a few pieces that provided interest but in my opinion the overall standard certainly wasn’t of a standard of past exhibitions. It’s on till 10 December at the Tamworth Art Gallery. www.tamworthregionalgallery.com.au

And a closer look at work by Jeanette Stock, Meredith Woolnough and Sally Blake.

 

I have released the start of next year’s studio classes. Check out www.kayfaulkner.com.au or this blog for more details. There’s more to be posted.

8-12 January (4 places left) and 19-23 February (1 place left) Linen and Lace

26-30 March (provisional) From a Twill Threading.

30 April- 4 May Beyond the Basics

11-16 June Special

6-10 August Two ties or Summer and Winter